Blur’s Clear View of Real Life ~ Sunday Song Series

Our Sunday Song Series, Week #44 selection (aptly titled Sunday Sunday), features alternative rock band Blur’s 1993 musical interpretation of traditional, Sunday activities. While some might deem drawing upon a slice of real life yawn-worthy, who, among us, would not also find such a thematic “hook” relatable?

Of course, some of us will be able to free associate Blur / Beatles comparisons considering how this track features [1] a musical arrangement reminiscent of the genius and sensibilities of the late Sir George Martin and [2] a storylined, frenzied videography evocative of the late Alun Owen… the gifted, imaginative screenwriter renown for A Hard Day’s Night.

Or, are my drawn parallels broad-brushed and/or overly charitable? If so, I guess we could chalk that up to my [1] now eyeballing far more days in my rearview mirror than on the road ahead, [2] wishful thinking that time travel could take us back to those magical, mystical Beatles yesterdays and [3] belief in Quantum Theory that suggests possible crossovers into alternative timelines… i.e., to points, somewhere in the vast Multiverse, where John Lennon had never been assassinated and George Harrison had not smoked himself into an early grave… where Owen and Martin, too, now enjoy a substantially enhanced longevity.

Don’t let me be misunderstood, either. Broaching such Beatles similarities is not to, in any way, detract from Blur’s own considerable body of work, created by singer/keyboardist Damon Albarn, guitarist/singer Graham Coxon, bassist Alex James and drummer Dave Rowntree. One must never blur Blur’s own, stand on their own eight feet, noteworthy talents.

If Blur blurring Beatles boundary lines occurs unintentionally, they could hardly be faulted for being under the Fab Four’s influence. I mean… one needn’t even be a musician to experience something so unavoidable.

Even if Blur’s blending occurs by design, it would be still be Albarn, Coxon, James and Rowntree clearly paying homage to Lennon, McCartney, Harrison and Starr. And who, among us, could not wholeheartedly offer up our “Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!” to such a sentiment?

And while we’re on the subject, why not say, “Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!” to our next Sunday Song, too? You are cordially invited back here… seven days from now…

 

 

 

 

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3,157,943 views and counting ~ Vid of the Day

These women rock! What more needs to be said?

Well… if I knew I had only 3 minutes and 12 seconds left to live, I’d choose this video to rock me off the Good Earth and into the Great Unknown…

 

 

 

43 Weeks and Counting (Sunday Song Series)

Back in the day… 1943 to be precise… the collaboration between composer Jimmy Van Heusen and lyricist Johnny Burke produced Sunday Monday Or Always… which now becomes the Week #43 installment of our Sunday Song Series.

This tune harkens back to the Big Band Era… which in all likelihood is way before your time… hell… it’s even way before this blogging dinosaur’s time.

In addition to the above video, I’ve located two other definitive performances and since I loved ‘em all, I’ll present them all and let you choose which one / ones to give a listen to. However this plays out, it’ll be win-win.

 

Nat King Cole

Bing Crosby & The Ken Darby Singers

 

You have my thanks for stopping by today and my invitation
to return seven days from now for our next Sunday song…

 

 

 

 

 

Seventeen Come Sunday (Sunday Song Series)

Throughout the ages, life enriching, mind expanding, mood elevating orchestral performances have been within earshot of anyone who’ll dare to be musically adventurous… bold enough to “go there”. For all who do (or yearn to) march to the beat of a different drum… awaiting you is our featured Sunday Song Series Week #42 track…

Ralph Vaughan Williams’ English Folk Song Suite I – Seventeen Come Sunday

I know. I know. Some deem classical music to be uncool. Within the first few played notes, they’re apt to cut and run towards the nearest red X’ed circular exit sign. That’s no exaggeration, either. The YouTube view counts on such vlogs oft languish in the “dusty” absolute zero zone.

So… why risk featuring such music in this venue? Because [1] I dig that different drumbeat and [2] when it comes down to lackluster site “hits”… well… hell… I could’ve written “The Book”. If the tracks I do spin and blog about here brand me the musical misfit / literary leper… HEY… it’s no skin off my… uh… nose.

I suppose my “sordid” musical past is “to blame”… i.e., my experiencing nearly an entire lifetime’s worth of classical music. There are countless examples, but, to cite just a few…

As a young’un and tween, playing in “heavy rotation” on my monaural record player was Johann Strauss’ The Blue Danube Waltz, op.314. And no kidding… there were even the 6:30 p.m., M-F airings of NBC-TV’s Huntley / Brinkley Report, which featured… as its closing theme song… a brief segment from Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, 2nd Movement… conducted by Arturo Toscanini

As a teenager, there were plenty of Sixties era orchestrally enhanced rockers. Instantly coming to mind is the Beatles’ A Day in the Life. And, as the Moody Blues could readily attest, it is possible to base and build an entire, half century long (and still counting) career upon Classical Music’s rock-solid foundation… starting with their entire album Days of Future Passed.

But that was the past… as for the future…

Our Sunday Song Series will be back seven days from now. Hopefully, you’ll be back, too?

 

ADDENDUM: Those above linked musical selections, if played back in their entirety, will take a bit over one hour. With time constraints being what they are in our lives, why not experience these tracks whilst cooking, dining, tidying up the joint, balancing the ol’ checkbook, studying… or even whilst creating your next blog post? Of course… that would mean missing out on some superb artwork which accompanies the Strauss vlog.

 

 

Raconteurs’ 11yr. Hiatus Now Over (Sunday Song Series)

Last week, on two successive telecasts, CBS Late Show host Stephen Colbert booked the Detroit hard rockers, the Raconteurs, to perform selections from their long anticipated new album, Help Us Stranger. If you missed either or both programs… or wish to reprise them… the linked song titles… Help Me Stranger and Bored And Razed… will get you there.

Of course, that above vid… Sunday Driver… another of that very album’s noteworthy tracks… is more consistent to this blog’s musical theme… making it the perfect Week #41 addition to our Sunday Song Series.

CAUTION: DON’T OPERATE HEAVY MACHINERY WHILE VIEWING THESE VERTIGO INDUCING VISUALS

J/K

Seeing how this amped up track amply speaks for itself, there’s not much left to say… save to say… you’re cordially invited to earwitness our next Sunday song… seven days from now…

 

 

 

Try DownPlaying This

The Beatles’ 1964 Stateside Tour involving their February 7th arrival in NYC (at the newly christened JFK International Airport) and appearance on Ed Sullivan’s nationally televised variety show (on the 9th) could not have been better timed.

Americans, still in deep mourning following the 11/22/1963 assassination of our youngest, ever, 35th President… John F. Kennedy… desperately needed a reminder that life could go on.

To all horrified by that grotesque gun violence… especially this (then) 9-year-young boy and my contemporaries… John, Paul, George and Ringo were the embodiment of youthful exuberance. While their prime-time TV debut showcased their unique interpretation of rock ’n’ roll… one eventually becoming the soundtrack of life for an entire generation… something even more significant was in play… namely… how their raucous energy / high decibel music was the perfect Rx for blowing away that lingering, pervasive, suffocating, Dealey Plaza stench.

So… why the need to rehash this nearly 56-year-old tragedy?

Because of the swamp monster, who has been masquerading as the 45th president. Even though he is alive and (physically) well… well…

Ever since the orderly transition of power to that disorderly doofus, We… America’s critical thinkers… have been mourning the 01/20/2017 death of the presidency… the death of democracy, decency, intellectualism, logic, liberty, peace and genuine patriotism… the death of joy, itself.

From that day forward… uh… better make that backward… We have been in deep mourning… in desperate need of a lifeline. But, where to go to find that?

My reader(s)… just when I had begun to suspect those DC Washington Woes had indelibly stained my mood… my entire outlook on life… a deep shade of blue… somehow… someway… on some entirely different plane of consciousness… I wound up free associating the power of music… its stain remover / curative capabilities. Lo and behold, the Fab Four came to mind.

True, I could not step into a time machine to re-witness the birth of the Beatles. But, the next best, equivalent was well within reach… my access to CDs representing JPGR’s entire, recording studio produced discography.

Last week… I decided to PB that massive, Beatles soundtrack in chronological order. No sooner had Sir Paul’s 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 counted in I Saw Her Standing There than I felt my much needed grin begin… followed, a scant nanosecond later, by my buoyant mood… those lofty spirits persisting while tracking (at a clip of one or more CDs per day) until I polished off all 13 Beatles albums plus the two Past Masters volumes. And there were a couple of bonus tracks, too… namely… Free as a Bird and Real Love (McCartney, Harrison and Starr’s 1995 collaboration / overdub of their tracks with the late Lennon’s two previously recorded vocal tracks).

Even upon completion of my musical adventure last Friday, I could still revel in the fact that this was far from over. Hence, my spending the better portion of this week listening to these bonus Beatles albums… [1] Star-Club Live! in Hamburg, Germany 1962, [2] Live at the BBC, [3] Yellow Submarine Songtrack, [4] 1! [5] Let It Be Naked / Fly on the Wall and [6] LOVE.

My parting recommendation… should you ever find yourself feeling down about anything, try taking your fave recording artist / band out for a spin. Once that smile returns to your face, I’m sure you’ll concur that the healing power of music can never be downplayed.